Magazine

Service design means business

When digital services became mainstream at the beginning of the millennium, enormous opportunities for innovation were created. It also became painfully evident to customers how organisations struggle to deliver consistent experiences across web sites, mobile, call centres and other channels. This is one of the key reasons that Livework was formed in 2001. There was clearly a need to design services that were consistently useful, usable and delightful to customers, where the needs of customers, the business and the organisation would exist in harmony.

Deceptively simple solutions to complex problems

As the first ‘service design’ firm in the world, Livework pioneered a new, practical and concrete approach to designing a customer’s experience across all channels, developing tools to deliver a new, practical and concrete approach to designing a customer’s experience across all channels. It quickly turned out that bringing an outside-in approach to improvement and innovation created value both for businesses and public services.  The art and science lies in the ability to imagine simple solutions to complex problems.

Customers – users – humans at the heart of it all

The key to simplicity is to focus on humans and their real-life needs and expectations when they deal with the organisation.  When companies really understand what their customers need, it becomes easier to navigate the intricacies of technology, systems and processes. Ultimately, a clear view of the human experience makes it easier to make good decisions and succeed in a competitive environment.

The proof is in the real world

In the past 13 years Livework developed  a range of tried and tested tools that help organisations deliver more value to customers. Through hundreds of projects in different sectors ranging from UN security services to mobile payment, a powerful knowledge base of inventive solutions to frequent problems has been established. Most importantly, the approach has brought about tangible results for some of the most respected companies in the world.

Enable meaningful change

Digging deep into customers’ lives helps organisations focus and imagine great experiences, but it’s not enough to bring about real change. Over the years more research and insight into the mechanics of how silos within organisations work together have become necessary, and ways of design systems and processes that can deliver on ambitious visions with customers have been developed. An ability to identify where the greatest benefit can be made for a business, and create solutions that make a difference that can be evidenced, has given Service Design added impact.

Connect customers with the business

Today, the skill set needed to design for great experiences goes beyond understanding customer’ needs and wants. It includes understanding principles of behavioural psychology, and how to apply them to meet economic goals. This makes it possible to imagine great design concepts for customers and connect them directly to the potential for business impact.

Connect customers to the organisation

In the past, customer experience design was heavily concerned with crafting how customers meet the organisation through different touch-points. Today, the attention has moved on to resolving  issues that frequently prevent organisations from satisfying customers. Challenges with underlying systems, processes, policies and how people are enabled to deliver services. This dramatically increases the chances that great ideas are implemented and brought to market successfully.

Design for customers, the organisation and for the business

Service design has proved to be a powerful tool beyond crafting experiences that make customers’ lives simpler and more enjoyable. When organisations engage in creative processes with customers as the focal point, it can drive extraordinary transformation. Coupled with a strong understanding of which actions will make the greatest difference for business impact, service design has come of age as a seriously smart instrument for business managers to achieve results.

Previous editions View all (58)

A second reading of McKinsey on Design
November 2018

A second reading of McKinsey on Design

Read more
Employee engagement: A salary is not all people work for
December 2018

Employee engagement: A salary is not all people work for

Read more
An agile-CX transformation at adidas
October 2018

An agile-CX transformation at adidas

Read more
Designing for a bright mobility future
September 2018

Designing for a bright mobility future

Read more
Smart machinery - the backlash
August 2018

Smart machinery - the backlash

Read more
Nudges aren’t the holy grail of behaviour change
July 2018

Nudges aren’t the holy grail of behaviour change

Read more
Interacting with Customers: Lessons from GDPR
June 2018

Interacting with Customers: Lessons from GDPR

Read more
Experiential shift: helping luxury brands evolve
March 2018

Experiential shift: helping luxury brands evolve

Read more